Raum: Seminar Room III, EG.080 Ort: CFEL (Bldg. 99)

Generation and control of super-octave-spanning spectra

Disputation
7691 1480511990

Presentation skills

IMPRS-UFAST skills course
“Poets are born – speakers are made.” Public speaking is a necessity in scientific life. Take part in this two-days course, find out what your strengths are and develop your individual presentation profile. Take steps to learn how to lead the audience from your first appearance on stage until the last question in the discussion. Be authentic, enthusiastic and convincing! [mehr]
Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) is a methodology routinely employed in computational spectroscopy to calculate photoemission and absorption spectra. However, usually these computational experiments are only possible for real nanostructures, solids, etc. by resorting to simple approximations in which, e.g., self-consistency is neglected. [mehr]

Tong Zhou - Quantum Spin-quantum Anomalous Hall Effect with Tunable Edge States in Sb Monolayer-based Materials

MPSD Seminar
The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect, quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect and (quantum) valley Hall ((Q)VH) effect have attracted considerable attention in condensed matter physics and material science. Generally, only one of the QAH, QSH, and QVH effects can be realized in a specific system. It would be very interesting if these three effects can be achieved in one single system. In this talk, I shall represent this interesting imagination may be realized in Sb monolayer-based materials, where the QAH state occurs at one valley and the QSH state occurs at the other valley, called quantum spin-quantum anomalous Hall (QSQAH) effect. [mehr]

Ryan Requist - Reduced formula for the macroscopic polarization including quantum Fluctuations

MPSD Seminar
The macroscopic polarization of a solid is an fundamental quantity from which permittivity and piezoelectric tensors can be derived. The Berry phase formula of King-Smith and Vanderbilt expresses the macroscopic polarization in terms of the Bloch states of a mean-field band structure, almost invariably taken from density functional theory. Although this procedure has been successful for many materials, quantum fluctuations cause it to break down in strongly correlated systems. [mehr]

Binghai Yan - Nonlinear optical responses of Weyl semimetal materials

MPSD Seminar
In the band structure of a Weyl semimetal (WSM), the conduction and valence bands cross each linearly through Weyl points that are usually treated as “monopoles” of the Berry curvature. As a second-order response, WSMs were very recently demonstrated to show strong nonlinear optical effects including an exotic nonlinear Hall effect. This is caused by the non-equilibrium distribution of the Berry curvature, described as the “dipole” of the Berry curvature. In this talk, I will talk about our recent computational results on nonlinear response for representative WSM materials TaAs and MoTe2. [mehr]

Franco Bonafé - Time-dependent electron-nuclear dynamics in DFTB+: theory and applications

MPSD Seminar
This seminar will be focused on an implementation of electron-nuclear real-time dynamics within the Density Functional Tight-Binding (DFTB) formalism in the DFTB+ package[1], as a result of a collaboration between the Quantum Dynamics Group (University of Córdoba) and the BCCMS (University of Bremen). Some theory details will be presented as well as its application to explain the launching of mechanical oscillations in metal nanoparticles under plasmon-resonant laser illumination[2]. [mehr]

Mitsuharo Uemoto - TDDFT+Maxwell multiscale method for lightpropagation calculation in semiconducting media

MPSD Seminar

Takashi Oka - Applied Floquet engineering

MPSD Seminar

Slow-Electrons Interacting with Light and Matter

MPSD Seminar

Sub-optical-cycle control of light and matter

MPSD Seminar

Liquid-Phase Electron Microscopy of Cells and Nanomaterials in Liquid

MPSD Seminar
Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has traditionally been associated with the study of thin solid samples in vacuum. With the availability of reliable thin membranes of silicon nitride, TEM of liquid specimens has become accessible with nanoscale resolution in the past decade [1]. The usage of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) presents a novel concept to study membrane proteins within whole mammalian cells in their native liquid environment [2]. The cells in liquid are placed in a microfluidic chamber enclosing the sample in the vacuum of the electron microscope, and are then imaged with STEM. It is not always necessary to enclose the cells in the microfluidic chamber. For many studies, it is sufficient to obtain information from the thin outer regions of the cells, and those can be imaged with high resolution using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with STEM detector [3]. A third option is to cover a liquid specimen under a thin membrane of graphene providing the thinnest possible layer [4]. Liquid STEM was used to explore the formation of HER2 homodimers at the single-molecule level in intact SKBR3 breast cancer cells in liquid state [3]. HER2 is a membrane protein and plays an important role in breast cancer aggressiveness and progression. Data analysis based on calculating the pair correlation function from individual HER2 positions revealed remarkable differences its functional state between rare- and bulk cancer cells with relevance for studying the role of cancer cell heterogeneity in drug response. We discovered a small sub-populations of cancer cells with a different response to a prescription drug [5]. Liquid STEM was also used to explore the behavior of nanoparticles in liquid in time-lapse experiments. It was discovered that nanoparticle movement in close proximity of the supporting silicon nitride membrane was three orders of magnitude slower than what was expected on the basis of Brownian motion for a bulk liquid [6], pointing to the existence of a layer of highly ordered liquid at the membrane. References [1] de Jonge, N. and Ross, F.M. Nat. Nanotechnol., 6, 695-704 (2011) [2] de Jonge, N., et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 106, 2159-2164 (2009) [3] Peckys, D.B., et al. Sci. Adv., 1, e1500165 (2015) [4] Dahmke, I.N., et al. ACS Nano, 11, 11108-11117 (2017) [5] Peckys, D.B., et al. Mol. Biol. Cell, 28, 3193-3202 (2017) [6] Verch, A., et al. Langmuir, 31, 6956–6964 (2015) [mehr]

Orbital-dependent improvements to density-functional approximations: Application of the FLO-SIC method

MPSD Seminar

Many-body dynamics in pump and probe experiments: From light amplification to terahertz STM

MPSD Seminar
I will discuss new theoretical approaches for analyzing pump and probe experiments in solid state systems. The focus will be on combining theoretical techniques from condensed matter physics and quantum optics. Several examples will be discussed, including light amplification in photo-excited superconductors and insulators, ultrafast molecular dynamics in terahertz-STM experiments. [mehr]

Electrical control of quantum spins

MPSD Seminar
Magnetic fields are challenging to localise to short length scales because their sources are electrical currents. Conversely, electric fields can be applied using electrostatic gates on scales limited only by lithography. This has important consequences for the design of spin-based information technologies: while the Zeeman interaction with a magnetic field provides a convenient tool for manipulating spins, it is difficult to achieve local control of individual spins on the length scale anticipated for useful quantum technologies. This motivates the study of electric field control of spin Hamiltonians [1]. Mn2+ defects in ZnO exhibit extremely long spin coherence times and a small axial zero-field splitting. Their environment is inversion-symmetry-broken, and the zero-field splitting shows a linear dependence on an externally-applied electric field. This control over the spin Hamiltonian offers a route to controlling the phase of superpositions of spin states using d.c. electric field pulses, and to driving spin transitions using microwave electric fields [2]. Experiments on Mn defects in ZnO provide insights into how to achieve manipulation of individual spins on surfaces using a scanning tunnelling microscope. A high-frequency voltage applied to the tip can drive electron spin resonance in Fe atoms on MgO surfaces via modulation of the crystal field experienced by the Fe atom [3]. It has been proposed theoretically that frustrated exchange-coupled molecular clusters might offer sensitivity to externally-applied electric fields [4]. Experiments on an antiferromagnetically-coupled Cu3 compound reveal a small linear electric field effect. A comparable sensitivity is exhibited by the heterometallic S = 1 antiferromagnetic ring Cr7Mn, but no effect is found for the S = 1/2 Cr7Ni [5]. [mehr]
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