MPSD Seminar

18035 1552472824

Cooperative valence dynamics in Anderson Lattices observed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

In rare earth intermetallics with weakly bound f-electrons and a Kondo energy scale much larger than magnetic exchange interactions or crystal field splittings, the screening of local moments may result in a non-magnetic Fermi liquid ground state [1]. At low temperatures, the quantum fluctuations between magnetic and non-magnetic valence configurations can then acquire a cooperative (lattice) character. On a phenomenological basis, a sound understanding of this Anderson Lattice phenomenon has been achieved. On the other hand, the microscopic description of the coherent coupling between Kondo-screened sites remains an outstanding theoretical challenge [2]. In experiment, the cooperative character of Anderson Lattices has only recently become directly accessible. Momentum-resolved spectroscopies, such as angle-resolved photoemission and inelastic neutron scattering, reveal the emergence of characteristic low-energy quasiparticle dynamics at low temperatures [3]. These methods probe single-particle excitations in the charge and magnetic channels, respectively. By contrast, high-resolution resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments couple to both charge and spin degrees of freedom in a non-trivial way and thus provide a more subtle point of view. If calculations of the underlying Kramers-Heisenberg term on a basis of strongly correlated f-electronic bands are achieved, RIXS may unlock unprecedented microscopic insights into the entanglement of local and itinerant charge and magnetic degrees of freedom. This would address a fundamental mechanism of quantum matter, with relevance far beyond lanthanides and actinides. I will review previous spectroscopic investigations of intermediate valence materials, present our recent RIXS results on the archetypal Anderson Lattice compound CePd3, and highlight some ideas for future x-ray scattering studies at 3rd and 4th generation light sources. [mehr]

MPSD Seminar

17056 1545215883

Probing Topological Matter by «Heating»: From Quantized Circular Dichroism to Tensor Monopoles

The intimate connection between topology and quantum physics has been widely explored in high-energy and solid-state physics, revealing a plethora of remarkable physical phenomena over the years. Building on their universal nature, topological properties are currently studied in an even broader context, ranging from ultracold atomic gases to photonics, where distinct observables and probes offer a novel view on topological quantum matter. [mehr]

MPSD Seminar

14266 1528122902

Synchrotron Radiation from an Accelerating Light Pulse

Synchrotron radiation is regularly generated at large-scale facilities where GeV electrons move along kilometer-long circular paths. Here, we use a metasurface to bend light and demonstrate synchrotron radiation produced by a sub-picosecond pulse, which moves along a circular arc of radius 100 μm inside a nonlinear crystal. The emitted radiation, in the THz frequency range, results from the nonlinear polarization induced by the pulse. The generation of synchrotron radiation from a pulse revolving continuously about a circular trajectory has profound implications for on-chip THz sources. We present the first step towards this realization. [mehr]

MPSD Seminar

14106 1526396916

High-harmonic spectroscopy using bi-elliptical fields

Over the recent years, high-harmonic generation has established itself as a promising spectroscopic technique. Notable examples include the tomographic imaging of molecular wave functions [1], the tracking of nuclear dynamics [2], and the reconstruction of the attosecond time-scale electron dynamics in molecules [3, 4].All these applications, however, have been limited to laser fields with linear polarization. High harmonic generation has only recently been extended to circularly-polarized drivers by utilizing a technique known as bi-circular high-harmonic generation (BHHG) [5,6,7]. In this talk, I will demonstrate the spectroscopic applications of this technique to the study of structure and dynamics of gas-phase atoms and molecules in a self-probing manner. I will start with an analysis of the helicity asymmetry of BHHG in noble-gas atoms and then proceed by illustrating how BHHG can be applied to study dynamical symmetry-breaking in a time-dependent manner in the context of rotational and vibrational molecular motion.Extension of high-harmonic generation to the regime of highly-elliptical fields opens up the way towards the study of chiral phenomena in high-harmonic generation. In this work, circular dichroism in the range of 3-8 % is observed on randomly oriented methyl oxirane (C3H6O) molecules in the gas phase. This chiral sensitivity is attributed to the sub-cycle chiral electron dynamics involving excited states of the cation that take place during the electron continuum propagation. Finally, I will present a study of time-dependent chirality based on following the temporal evolution of circular dichroism during the course of an ultrafast photodissociation reaction. [mehr]

 
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