Speaker: Michael Sentef

Solid State Physics

IMPRS-UFAST core course
From a microscopic point of view, a solid is just a regular arrangement of atoms, embedded in a soup of electrons. Yet, a remarkably rich manifold of phenomena emerges from this simple starting point, ranging from simple metals and semiconductors to multiple kinds of magnetic order or superconductivity. In this course we will discuss basic properties of solids and their microscopic understanding. [more]

Superconductivity - IMPRS-UFAST focus course

IMPRS-UFAST focus course
This course covers the basic phenomenology and microscopic theory of superconductivity: - definition of superconductors and their thermodynamics - microscopic BCS theory: electron-phonon interaction, Fröhlich Hamiltonian, Cooper instability, mean-field theory, Bogoliubons [more]

Topological band theory - IMPRS-UFAST focus course

IMPRS-UFAST focus course
This course covers basic concepts in the topological classification of band structures of solids, the development of which led to the Physics Nobel Prize in 2016 for Thouless, Kosterlitz and Haldane. [more]

Hubbard Model

IMPRS-UFAST focus course
The Hubbard model is the drosophila of condensed matter physics. It is perhaps the simplest possible model capturing the competition between localization of electrons in solids due to Coulomb repulsion and delocalization in energy bands due to kinetic energy lowering. Invented in the early 1960s to descibe magnetism in transition-metal monoxides, it has been generalized and applied to a host of problems in condensed matter including heavy fermions or high-temperature superconductors. Despite its apparent simplicity it shows complicated phase diagrams that depend on dimensionality and lattice coordination as well as electronic filling, with only few exact solutions in limiting cases known to this date. [more]
Strong electronic correlations are a main driver behind many exciting phenomena in quantum many-body systems, ranging from correlated quantum materials (Mott transition, high-temperature superconductivity) to cold atoms in optical lattices. However, the strong-correlation problem still poses many challenges when it comes to a quantitative and even qualitative understanding of the relevant degrees of freedom and microscopic interactions that drive phase transitions in solids. Dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), first developed in the late 1980s and 1990s, provides one key limit in which the correlation problem becomes tractable, namely the one of large spatial dimensions, or local self-energies. In this focus course we will discuss the basics behind DMFT and learn how this allows one to understand the paradigmatic Mott metal-to-insulator transition. [more]
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